New exhibition until Sunday October 29th 2017


Visitors out and about in Worcestershire during October may come across a major exhibition of paintings by two Worcester based artists, Paul Powis & Sara Hayward. Their joint exhibition, “Landscape: Towards Abstraction,” is at the GreenStage Gallery, at the Hop Pocket, Bishops Frome, Worcestershire,WR6 5BT, until Sunday October 29th.

“We were delighted when Mr Will Pudge, the gallery director of GreenStage gallery, visited our Worcestershire Open Studio event last August and invited us to show at the GreenStage gallery this autumn. Will is a tour de force in the art world regularly exhibiting at the Affordable Art Fair in Battersea,“ said Sara. “It is a great gallery for this exhibition of more than thirty original paintings and a unique opportunity to see vibrant, heightened colour at its most expressive. I really love Paul’s latest landscapes, inspired by the Teme valley.”

Paul Powis trained as an abstract painter and became interested in landscape when he moved to Worcestershire from London in 1988. Since then he has become an internationally recognised artist with collections in America, Japan and Europe. As well as working extensively for galleries Paul works in publishing in the form of limited edition silkscreen prints, book covers, calendars and greeting cards. Closer to home his work can be seen on permanent display in The Place To Eat restaurant at John Lewis, Bristol and in the Italian restaurant on board the Queen Mary II. Other clients include Harper Collins, Washington Green, Nouvelles Images and IKEA. His work is predominantly about subjective colour and vibrant mark-making. Paul often paints his landscapes in early morning or late afternoon in order to capture long shadows raking over fields and hills. Although his paintings are representational, they lean towards abstraction using constructional spatial devices in the composition, and use of subjective colour to describe space.

Sara Hayward studied at the Ruskin School of Drawing & Fine Art at Oxford University before going on to study printmaking at the Royal College of Art, London. Eight large scale abstract paintings inspired by the gardens at Winterbourne House & Garden are on display. Travels abroad visiting European art collections have also inspired her recent work. Sara was commissioned recently to paint the portrait of Henry Sandon MBE which is on permanent display at the Museum of Royal Worcester.

http://www.greenstagegallery.co.uk

Teme Valley III lr

Advertisements

new work


Image

my exhibition at winterbourne show cases eight new abstracts and i will be talking about them this thursday during the lunchtime lecture. i’ll also be showing behind the scenes photographs taken during the making of our film, remembrance of things passed, and talking about the making of the portraits which are a new addition to the walls of winterbourne house. previously unseen photographs of winterbourne house & garden taken in the snow last january will also be seen when three feet of snow fell whilst the house was closed; a magical landscape. i have put together 100 odd images to show and just need to find now a memory stick with enough memory to store the material so i can bring it over on thursday. there was  mention of the exhibition in saturday’s birmingham mail. hope to see you there! birmingham mail article

Remembrance of Things Passed


A collaboration between Indian filmmaker, Parul Punjabi and British artist, Sara Hayward, the film recreates the life of an Edwardian English family and the several secrets they held- relying heavily on the dreams and memories of the various characters, instead of a linear, narrative description of their lives. Set in the idyllic, quintessentially English Winterbourne House and Gardens and structured loosely as a meditative, mood-poem, the film seeks to capture both the exterior visible reality and the inner subtle reality of its characters.

Building on Proust’s famous quote, ‘Remembrance of things past is not necessarily the remembrance of things as they were’, the filmmakers pay homage to the very idea of memory as they collectively remember the everyday life in the early 20th century. With no dialogue, the natural sounds and dreamlike imagery become crucial in evoking this memory of a bygone era.

winterbourne snow


Image

when i began my residency at winterbourne last january the snow had fallen and shaped winterbourne into a visually softened silent spectacle different to all that was to follow in the ensuing months of growth. this painting sought to capture the quiet beauty of the changed landscape and was the view form my studio window.

winterbourne revisited


winterbourne revisited

john nettlefold (1866-1930)

this painting of john nettlefold sought to capture his steely determination as he not only had built the first house in birmingham to have electricity (winterbourne in 1903) but also went onto forge through dynamic house planning which would change the lives of many for the better. sadly he himself went on to suffer ill health thereafter which must have been a tremendous worry for his close family.

my exhibition winterbourne revisited opens on 01 february and as you can imagine i am putting the final finishing touches to and framing the 18 paintings which will feature in the exhibition. to wet your appetite here is one portrait study of john nettlefold which will hang in the main house, and  hopefully in his study in a few weeks time. my stomach is turning as i anticipate the public’s reaction to my ten month residency. inspired by such an old and by now dear friend such as winterbourne has been amazing; thank you winterbourne for having me.

Remembrance of Things Passed


Upon the bridge at Winterbourne

Upon the bridge at Winterbourne

On a rare sunny day in mid June 2013 a short film was shot  with Parul Punjabi, a scholarship student in film studies at Birmingham University, at Winterbourne House & Garden, Edgbaston, Birmingham. The film, Remembrance of Things Passed will be shown at Winterbourne from February 2014. Much planning and days of preparation paid off as on the day as we were able to film  4 hours of footage which Parul expertly edited down to  22 minutes.  As Winterbourne is open daily it was difficult fielding visitors so that they were out of shot; I lost count of the number of times I said, “Excuse me, could you possibly…” The film features my daughter Sylvie Powis and Winterbourne gardener Phil Smith. Each were amenable and a joy to work with.